Apprentissage fondé sur l'enquête : Différence entre versions

De Wiki-TEDia
Aller à : navigation, rechercher
(Bibliographie)
(Bibliographie)
Ligne 145 : Ligne 145 :
  
 
== Bibliographie ==
 
== Bibliographie ==
Abdelraheem, A. & Asan, A. (2006). The effectiveness of inquiry-based technology enhanced collaborative learning environment. // International Journal of Technology in Teaching and Learning. 2(2), P. 65-87.  
+
Abdelraheem, A. & Asan, A. (2006). The effectiveness of inquiry-based technology enhanced collaborative learning environment. // International Journal of Technology in Teaching and Learning. 2(2), P. 65-87. <br/>
Albright, K., Petrulis, R., Vasconcelos A., Wood J. (2012). An inquiry-based approach to teaching research methods in Information Studies. // Education for Information. 29. P. 19-38.  
+
Albright, K., Petrulis, R., Vasconcelos A., Wood J. (2012). An inquiry-based approach to teaching research methods in Information Studies. // Education for Information. 29. P. 19-38. <br/>
Andras, S. (2012). Constructing with non-standard bricks. // Australian Mathematic Teacher. 68(4). P. 23-29.  
+
Andras, S. (2012). Constructing with non-standard bricks. // Australian Mathematic Teacher. 68(4). P. 23-29.<br/>
Anderson, R. (2002). Reforming science teaching: What research says about inquiry. // Journal of Science Teacher Education, 13, P. 1–2.  
+
Anderson, R. (2002). Reforming science teaching: What research says about inquiry. // Journal of Science Teacher Education, 13, P. 1–2.<br/>
Astolfi, J.-P., & Develay, M. (2002). La didactique des sciences (6e éd. mise à jour ed.). Paris: Presses universitaires de France.  
+
Astolfi, J.-P., & Develay, M. (2002). La didactique des sciences (6e éd. mise à jour ed.). Paris: Presses universitaires de France. <br/>
Banchi, H. Bell, R. (2008).  The Many Levels of Inquiry. // The Learning Centre of the NSTA. Retrieved October 2012.   
+
Banchi, H. Bell, R. (2008).  The Many Levels of Inquiry. // The Learning Centre of the NSTA. Retrieved October 2012.<br/>  
Bruner, J. S. (1961). The act of discovery. Harvard Educational Review 31 (1): P. 21–32.  
+
Bruner, J. S. (1961). The act of discovery. Harvard Educational Review 31 (1): P. 21–32. <br/>
Chang, K., Sung, Y, Lee, C. (2003). Web-based collaborative inquiry learning. // Journal of Computer Assisted learning. 19. P. 56-69.  
+
Chang, K., Sung, Y, Lee, C. (2003). Web-based collaborative inquiry learning. // Journal of Computer Assisted learning. 19. P. 56-69. <br/>
Collins, A., Brown, J. S., & Newman, S. E. (1989). Cognitive apprenticeship: teaching the craft of reading, writing, and mathematics. In L. B. Resnick (Ed.), Knowing, learning, and instruction: essays in honor of Robert Glaser (pp. 453-494). Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.
+
Collins, A., Brown, J. S., & Newman, S. E. (1989). Cognitive apprenticeship: teaching the craft of reading, writing, and mathematics. In L. B. Resnick (Ed.), Knowing, learning, and instruction: essays in honor of Robert Glaser (pp. 453-494). Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum. <br/>
Cothron, J., Giese, R., & Rezba, R. (1996). Science experiments and projects for students. Dubuque, IA: Kendall-Hunt Publishing Company.
+
Cothron, J., Giese, R., & Rezba, R. (1996). Science experiments and projects for students. Dubuque, IA: Kendall-Hunt Publishing Company. <br/>
Dewey, J. (1910). Science as subject-matter and as method. // Science, 31, 121–127.
+
Dewey, J. (1910). Science as subject-matter and as method. // Science, 31, 121–127. <br/>
Dewey, J. (1916). Method in science teaching. // The Science Quarterly, 1, 3–9.
+
Dewey, J. (1916). Method in science teaching. // The Science Quarterly, 1, 3–9. <br/>
Dewey, J. (1938). Experience and education. New York: Collier Books.
+
Dewey, J. (1938). Experience and education. New York: Collier Books. <br/>
Dewey, J (1997) How We Think. New York: Dover Publications.  
+
Dewey, J (1997) How We Think. New York: Dover Publications. <br/>
Geier, R., Blumenfeld, P. C., Marx, R. W., Krajcik, J. S., Fishman, B., Soloway, E., et al. (2008). Standardized test outcomes for students engaged in inquiry-based science curricula in the context of urban reform. // Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 45(8), 922-939.
+
Geier, R., Blumenfeld, P. C., Marx, R. W., Krajcik, J. S., Fishman, B., Soloway, E., et al. (2008). Standardized test outcomes for students engaged in inquiry-based science curricula in the context of urban reform. // Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 45(8), 922-939. <br/>
Hmelo-Silver, C., Duncan, R., & Chinn, C. (2007). Scaffolding and achievement in problem-based and inquiry learning: A response to Kirschner, Sweller, and Clark (2006). // Educational Psychologist, 42(2), P. 99-107.  
+
Hmelo-Silver, C., Duncan, R., & Chinn, C. (2007). Scaffolding and achievement in problem-based and inquiry learning: A response to Kirschner, Sweller, and Clark (2006). // Educational Psychologist, 42(2), P. 99-107. <br/>
Eick, C.J. & Reed, C.J. (2002). What Makes an Inquiry Oriented Science Teacher? The Influence of Learning Histories on Student Teacher Role Identity and Practice. // Science Teacher Education, 86, P. 401-416.  
+
Eick, C.J. & Reed, C.J. (2002). What Makes an Inquiry Oriented Science Teacher? The Influence of Learning Histories on Student Teacher Role Identity and Practice. // Science Teacher Education, 86, P. 401-416. <br/>
Kubicek, J. (2005a). Inquiry-based learning, the nature of science, and computer technology: New possibilities in science education. // Canadian Journal of Learning and Technology, 31(1), P. 51-64.
+
Kubicek, J. (2005a). Inquiry-based learning, the nature of science, and computer technology: New possibilities in science education. // Canadian Journal of Learning and Technology, 31(1), P. 51-64.<br/>
 
Laursen, S., Hassi, M. M.-L., Kogan, M., Hunter, A.-B. & Weston, T. (2011). Evaluation of the IBL Mathematics Project: Student and instructor outcomes of inquiry-based learning in college mathematics. Colorado University.
 
Laursen, S., Hassi, M. M.-L., Kogan, M., Hunter, A.-B. & Weston, T. (2011). Evaluation of the IBL Mathematics Project: Student and instructor outcomes of inquiry-based learning in college mathematics. Colorado University.
Martin-Hauser, L. (2002). Defining inquiry. The Science Teacher, 69(2), P. 34–37.
+
Martin-Hauser, L. (2002). Defining inquiry. The Science Teacher, 69(2), P. 34–37. <br/>
Villavicencio, J. (2000). Inquiry in Kindergarten. // Connect Magazine, 13 (4), March/April 2000. Synergy Learning Publication.  
+
Villavicencio, J. (2000). Inquiry in Kindergarten. // Connect Magazine, 13 (4), March/April 2000. Synergy Learning Publication. <br/>
Vygotsky, L.S. (1962). Thought and Language, Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.  
+
Vygotsky, L.S. (1962). Thought and Language, Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. <br/>
Schwab, J. (1960). Enquiry, the science teacher, and the educator. // The Science Teacher, 27, 6–11.
+
Schwab, J. (1960). Enquiry, the science teacher, and the educator. // The Science Teacher, 27, 6–11. <br/>
Schwab, J. (1966). The teaching of science. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.  
+
Schwab, J. (1966). The teaching of science. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. <br/>
Song,Y.,  Shwenz, R. (2013). An Inquiry Based Approach to Teaching the Spherical Earth Model to preservice teachers using the global positioning system. // Journal of College Science Teaching. Vol. 42. No 4. P. 50-58.  
+
Song,Y.,  Shwenz, R. (2013). An Inquiry Based Approach to Teaching the Spherical Earth Model to preservice teachers using the global positioning system. // Journal of College Science Teaching. Vol. 42. No 4. P. 50-58. <br/>
Suchman, J. (1972). A child and the Inquiry process. // The Psychology of Open Teaching and Learning. Ed. M.L. Silberman, et al. Boston: Little, Brown. P. 147-159.
+
Suchman, J. (1972). A child and the Inquiry process. // The Psychology of Open Teaching and Learning. Ed. M.L. Silberman, et al. Boston: Little, Brown. P. 147-159. <br/>
  Watt S. J., Therrien, William J., Kaldenberg E, and Taylor J. (2013).  Promoting Inclusive Practices in Inquiry Based  Science Classrooms. // Teaching Exceptional Children. Vol. 45. No 4. P. 40-48.
+
  Watt S. J., Therrien, William J., Kaldenberg E, and Taylor J. (2013).  Promoting Inclusive Practices in Inquiry Based  Science Classrooms. // Teaching Exceptional Children. Vol. 45. No 4. P. 40-48. <br/>
 
Tatar, N. (2012). Inquiry based science laboratories: an analysis of pre-service teachers’ beliefs about learning science through  inquiry and their performances. //  Journal of Baltic Science Education. Vol. 11, No 3, P. 248-266.  
 
Tatar, N. (2012). Inquiry based science laboratories: an analysis of pre-service teachers’ beliefs about learning science through  inquiry and their performances. //  Journal of Baltic Science Education. Vol. 11, No 3, P. 248-266.  
Thelen, H. (1960). Education and the human quest. New York: Harper & Row.  
+
Thelen, H. (1960). Education and the human quest. New York: Harper & Row. <br/>
 
Yasar, S & Nuban, N. (2009). Students’ opinions regarding to the inquiry-based learning approach. // Elementary Education Online. 8(2), P. 457-475.
 
Yasar, S & Nuban, N. (2009). Students’ opinions regarding to the inquiry-based learning approach. // Elementary Education Online. 8(2), P. 457-475.
  

Version du 3 octobre 2014 à 14:21

Ébauche


Appellation en anglais

Inquiry-based learning (IBL), Inquiry-based teaching, Inquiry Based Learning Strategy (IBLS)

Stratégies apparentées

Apprentissage par découverte guidée

Dialogue socratique

Type de stratégie

macrostratégie

Types de connaissances

La macrostratégie «Apprentissage fondé sur l'enquête» vise à favoriser la construction des connaissances conceptuelles. Premièrement, on applique cette macrostratégie en sciences naturelles. Cette macrostratégie est plus répandue dans l’enseignement des mathématiques, de la physique, de la biologie.

Description

IBL est une stratégie pédagogique pour engager apprenants de trouver les solutions, les réponses pour les problèmes scientifiques ou sociaux. La recherche et la collaboration créent deux axes pour développer les compétences de chercher l’information, de penser à la manière critique, de construire certaines réponses sur problèmes théoriques.

Il est possible de commencer l’histoire de cette stratégie par la méthode philosophique du questionnement de Socrate. Au XIX-ième siècle les scientifiques se tournaient vers certaines idées de Socrate par rapport à la formation des sciences naturelles.

L’histoire de la méthode d’IBL a amorcé son mouvement aux années 60 dans les travaux de J. Bruner, J. Schwab, M. Herron, aux années 80 dans les travaux de S. Papert.

Date Fait Raison
1910 John Dewey a proposé d’intégrer « Inquiry » ou Inquiry Based Learning (l’apprentissage par la recherche) dans les programmes de l’enseignement de la science aux écoles Dans l’enseignement il existe beaucoup d’attention pour les faits mais les apprenants ne développent pas les capacités à réfléchir
1916 Dewey a proposé 6 étapes pour la méthode « Inquiry »:

1) un sentiment que le problème existe; 2) la clarification du problème; 3) la formulation d’une hypothèse provisoire; 4) test; 5) la révision des tests; 6) la solution

Pour faciliter l’activité des apprenants
1937 Le modèle de Dewey nommé « Science dans l’enseignement secondaire » (Science in Secondary Education) a été adopté dans la Commission des programmes des Écoles secondaires aux États-Unis Continuer à institutionnaliser de nouvelles méthodes dans le système d'éducation
1938 John Dewey a indiqué que les problèmes devaient correspondre aux expériences des apprenants, à leurs capacités intellectuelles Pour faciliter l’engagement des apprenants, pour développer les programmes d’apprentissage « en agissant »
1944 John Dewey a modifié son modèle de la méthode « Inquiry ». Il a distingué 4 étapes : 1) présentation du problème; 2) la formulation du problème; 3) la collection des données pendant les essais; 4) la présentation de la conclusion Continuer à élaborer les méthodes pour faciliter la pensée réflexive
1960 Joseph Schwab a proposé deux types d’IBL : constant (l’accumulation constante du corps des connaissances) et fluide (les fluctuations révolutionnaires dans l’accumulation des connaissances) Développer la mentalité de recherche dans l’époque « post-Spoutnik »
1966 Joseph Schwab a identifié deux positions principales face à « IBL » : développer les structures conceptuelles de la science, les réviser constamment; étudier « enquiry into enquiry » : développer la culture de la discussion, étudier les recherches sur les technologies, sur l’interprétation des données Développer la mentalité de recherche
1989 « Projet 2061 » de l’Association Américaine de l’avancement de la science (AAAS). Les recommandations du projet 2061: commencer par les questions; encourager les apprenants de participer activement; travailler en équipes; mémoriser les termes techniques Développer l’alphabétisation scientifique
1996 Cothron a proposé « Quatre-question stratégie » : 1) trouver matériels disponibles; 2) étudier, comment changer le système des matériels; 3) trouver le thème principal; 4) étudier, comment changer le thème principale Proposer la matrice pour les enseignants qui utilisent IBL
2001 Projet “Atlas of Scientific Literacy” (AAAS) Développer l’alphabétisation scientifique
2001 Lee and Fradd ont construit une nouvelle matrice de la construction du cours « Inquiry » : questionner, planifier, réaliser, faire les conclusions, répéter, appliquer Développer l’alphabétisation scientifique

Parmi des prémisses théoriques de cette macrostratégie on peut nommer :

  • la psychologie soviétique : les travaux de L. Vygotsky, A.N. Leontiev, A.R. Luria (les années 20-60) ;
  • la psychologie américaine : les travaux de J. Bruner (les années 60-70) ;
  • la philosophie américaine de pragmatisme et d’instrumentalisme qui souligne la nécessité d’apprentissage en agissant (learning by doing), d’apprentissage en contexte qui doit former des apprenants selon leur expérience : les travaux de William James, John Dewey (les années 40-90) ;
  • la logique : les travaux du logicien finlandais Jaakko Hintikka (les années 80-90).


Apprentissage par enquête (IBL) est souvent décrit comme un cycle ou une spirale, ce qui implique la formulation d'une question, une investigation, la création d'une solution ou d'une réponse appropriée, une discussion et une réflexion basée avec les résultats (Bishop et al., 2004). IBL, inspiré par le socio–constructivisme, se base sur le travail collaboratif : les étudiants trouvent des ressources, utilisent des outils et des ressources fournies par les partenaires d'investigation. Ainsi les apprenants font des progrès en partageant leur travail, en discutant et en construisant le travail collaboratif. Maintenant il existe de nombreuses définitions d’IBL avec nombreux sens commençant par l’enseignement ouvert finissant par scaffolding (Watt, Therrien, Kaldenberg, Taylor, 2013, p.41).

Selon Watt et al. (2013) les trois composants sont toujours importants:

  • 1. Les apprenants mènent l’investigation en classes.
  • 2. Les apprenants échangent des idées par le questionnement, par la négociation et par la résolution du problème.
  • 3. Les professeurs doivent élargir, enrichir les standards d’enseignement.

Selon Tatar (2012, p. 248) les cinq composants sont toujours pertinents :

  • 1. Les étudiants proposent les questions scientifiques.
  • 2. Les étudiants fournissent les preuves en cherchant les réponses sur questions.
  • 3. Les étudiants cherchent les explications scientifiques.
  • 4. Les étudiants précisent leurs explications par rapport aux explications d’autres.
  • 5. Les étudiants communiquent pour vérifier leurs explications.

Un cycle d'investigation est un processus qui essaie de permettre à l’apprenant, à l'étudiant de répondre à ces questions avec les informations qu'il a connecté, ce qui permet la création de nouvelles idées et concepts. Le cycle d'investigation a cinq étapes globales :

  • Questionner,
  • Enquêter,
  • Créer,
  • Discuter,
  • Réfléchir.
  • Questionner : cette étape se focalise sur un problème ou une question que les étudiants commencent à définir. Thelen (1960) met en évidence l'importance du "puzzlement" qu'on peut peut-être associer au conflit socio-cognitif (Astolfi 2002) qui doit résulter de la situation que l'enseignant à mise en place. Il ne s'agit pas simplement de donner aux apprenants un problème à résoudre, mais d'une situation qui interroge et interpelle les apprenants. Les questions peuvent apparaître dans la confrontation aux conceptions différentes des apprenants. Les questions doivent donc émerger du groupe d'apprenants dans un processus que l'enseignant suscite, anime, mais ne manipule pas. Questionner mène naturellement à enquêter qui consiste à accompagner la curiosité vers la recherche d'informations. Des apprenants ou des groupes des apprenants collectent les informations, étudient, utilisent des ressources pédagogiques, expérimentent, observent, dessinent. Ils peuvent déjà redéfinir la question, l'éclaircir ou prendre une autre direction que la question initiale ne permettait pas d'anticiper.
  • Créer : Les informations collectées commencent à se rejoindre. Les étudiants commencent à faire des liens. La capacité à synthétiser le sens devient la plus importante qui permet la formation de nouvelles connaissances. Les apprenants créent de nouvelles pensées, idées, hypothèses qui ne sont pas directement inspirées par leur propre expérience. Ainsi ils l'écrivent dans une sorte de rapport.
  • Discuter : Les apprenants échangent leurs idées, interrogent d’autres sur leurs propres expériences et investigations.
  • Réfléchir: Cette étape consiste à prendre du temps pour regarder en arrière. Penser à nouveau à la question initiale, le chemin emprunté et les conclusions actuelles. Les apprenants regardent en arrière et prennent de nouvelles décisions : "Une solution a-t-elle été trouvée?", "De nouvelles décisions ont-elle été prises?", "De nouvelles questions sont-elles apparues?", "Que pourraient-ils demander?" (Wikipédia)


--Margarita 3 octobre 2014 à 12:33 (EDT)

Conditions favorisant l’apprentissage

Identifier, expliquer et justifier les conditions d’apprentissage que la stratégie vise à favoriser. Décrire quelle est la preuve empirique de l’efficacité de la stratégie.

Niveau d’expertise des apprenants

Identifier si la stratégie est adaptée aux apprenants débutants, intermédiaires ou novices dans un domaine. Décrire comment la stratégie prend en considération le niveau des connaissances des apprenants dans le domaine ciblé. Donner des exemples.

Type de guidage

Selon Banchi et Bell (2008) on peut distinguer les quatre types de guidage offert par « Inquiry Based Learning », commençant par le guidage structuré finissant par le guidage ouvert :

  • 1. Questionnaire confirmé : on propose le questionnaire, les résultats : les apprenants doivent les confirmer.
  • 2. Questionnaire structuré : on propose le questionnaire aux étudiants
  • 3. Questionnaire guidé : on propose seulement les questions de recherche
  • 4. Questionnaire ouvert : les apprenants définissent les questions eux-mêmes.

Selon Alberta Education (2005) citant Crawford (2000), les enseignants, qui utilisent cette stratégie d'apprentissage, puevnt jouer différents rôles. Dix ont été répertoriés (p.27).

  1. Motivateur
  2. Diagnosticien
  3. Guide
  4. Innovateur
  5. Expérimentateur
  6. Chercheur
  7. Modèle
  8. Mentor
  9. Collaborateur
  10. Apprenant

Type de regroupement des apprenants

Décrire le type de regroupement préconisé par la stratégie et comment on peut le réaliser. Donner des exemples.

Milieu d’intervention

À qui s’adresse cette macrostratégie ? Elle s’adresse à un large spectre des apprenants et d’enseignants intervenant en milieu scolaire, collégial, universitaire, aux entreprises; aux pédagogues passionnés, qui réfléchissent et qui veulent créer de nouvelles stratégies pédagogiques d’apprentissage d’un monde de la Société des connaissances.

Conseils pratiques

Selon Anderson (2002) les difficultés pour développer cette méthode à l’école sont les suivantes :

  • difficultés techniques : les difficultés d’organiser le travail en groupe, le développement professionnel inadéquat parmi les enseignants, les difficultés de jouer le rôle de facilitateur;
  • difficultés politiques : résistance parmi les parents; peu de programmes pour éduquer les enseignants d’utiliser cette méthode; pas de consensus parmi les enseignants, comment enseigner;
  • difficultés culturelles : la qualité de manuels; beaucoup de discussions mais peu de réalisations.

Les apprenants aussi rencontrent nombreux problèmes. Selon Geier, R., Blumenfeld, P., Marx, R.W. Krajcik, J. S. Fishman, B., Soloway, E., Clay-Chambers, J. (2008) ce sont les difficultés du travail en équipe pour les étudiants des contextes culturels différents; les problèmes socio-économiques; la mauvaise qualité des manuels (p. 923).

Le principe d’organisation d’IBL semble d’être simple : formuler des questions – faire des recherches – proposer des solutions – discuter sur des solutions – faire la réflexion liée aux résultats (Bishop et al., 2004). Pourtant, IBL demande la planification rigoureuse, le support constant d’apprenants dans le processus de l'enquête. La méthode demande une très bonne préparation parmi les professeurs, elle peut être difficile de l’apprivoiser pour certains, selon Tatar (2012, p. 249). Il est difficile pour les professeurs de développer les capacités de mener les étudiants vers la formulation de questions (Tatar, 2012, p. 249, Neumann, 2012).

Le Ministère d'éducation aux États-Unis, la Commission européenne souligne la nécessité de l’utilisation de cette méthode aux collèges et universités, selon Andras (2012, p. 23) (voir aussi Wallberg-Henriksson et al., 2006). Les raisons sont suivantes: La macrostratégie est proche de la science, du processus de recherches (Tatar, 2012; Albright, 2012). Elle développe les compétences de recherche, la culture de recherche parmi les apprenants (Albright, 2012). Elle représente un système pour organiser l’information et ses liens (Watt, Therrien, Kaldenberg, Taylor, p. 41); prépare et pose les questions significatives pour la vie sociale et personnelle (Booth, 2013, p.26); peut aider à développer les capacités cognitives de haut niveau (Neumann, 2012). Les apprenants sont satisfaits de s’engager dans le processus de recherche (Albright, 2012).

Bibliographie

Abdelraheem, A. & Asan, A. (2006). The effectiveness of inquiry-based technology enhanced collaborative learning environment. // International Journal of Technology in Teaching and Learning. 2(2), P. 65-87.
Albright, K., Petrulis, R., Vasconcelos A., Wood J. (2012). An inquiry-based approach to teaching research methods in Information Studies. // Education for Information. 29. P. 19-38.
Andras, S. (2012). Constructing with non-standard bricks. // Australian Mathematic Teacher. 68(4). P. 23-29.
Anderson, R. (2002). Reforming science teaching: What research says about inquiry. // Journal of Science Teacher Education, 13, P. 1–2.
Astolfi, J.-P., & Develay, M. (2002). La didactique des sciences (6e éd. mise à jour ed.). Paris: Presses universitaires de France.
Banchi, H. Bell, R. (2008). The Many Levels of Inquiry. // The Learning Centre of the NSTA. Retrieved October 2012.
Bruner, J. S. (1961). The act of discovery. Harvard Educational Review 31 (1): P. 21–32.
Chang, K., Sung, Y, Lee, C. (2003). Web-based collaborative inquiry learning. // Journal of Computer Assisted learning. 19. P. 56-69.
Collins, A., Brown, J. S., & Newman, S. E. (1989). Cognitive apprenticeship: teaching the craft of reading, writing, and mathematics. In L. B. Resnick (Ed.), Knowing, learning, and instruction: essays in honor of Robert Glaser (pp. 453-494). Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.
Cothron, J., Giese, R., & Rezba, R. (1996). Science experiments and projects for students. Dubuque, IA: Kendall-Hunt Publishing Company.
Dewey, J. (1910). Science as subject-matter and as method. // Science, 31, 121–127.
Dewey, J. (1916). Method in science teaching. // The Science Quarterly, 1, 3–9.
Dewey, J. (1938). Experience and education. New York: Collier Books.
Dewey, J (1997) How We Think. New York: Dover Publications.
Geier, R., Blumenfeld, P. C., Marx, R. W., Krajcik, J. S., Fishman, B., Soloway, E., et al. (2008). Standardized test outcomes for students engaged in inquiry-based science curricula in the context of urban reform. // Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 45(8), 922-939.
Hmelo-Silver, C., Duncan, R., & Chinn, C. (2007). Scaffolding and achievement in problem-based and inquiry learning: A response to Kirschner, Sweller, and Clark (2006). // Educational Psychologist, 42(2), P. 99-107.
Eick, C.J. & Reed, C.J. (2002). What Makes an Inquiry Oriented Science Teacher? The Influence of Learning Histories on Student Teacher Role Identity and Practice. // Science Teacher Education, 86, P. 401-416.
Kubicek, J. (2005a). Inquiry-based learning, the nature of science, and computer technology: New possibilities in science education. // Canadian Journal of Learning and Technology, 31(1), P. 51-64.
Laursen, S., Hassi, M. M.-L., Kogan, M., Hunter, A.-B. & Weston, T. (2011). Evaluation of the IBL Mathematics Project: Student and instructor outcomes of inquiry-based learning in college mathematics. Colorado University. Martin-Hauser, L. (2002). Defining inquiry. The Science Teacher, 69(2), P. 34–37.
Villavicencio, J. (2000). Inquiry in Kindergarten. // Connect Magazine, 13 (4), March/April 2000. Synergy Learning Publication.
Vygotsky, L.S. (1962). Thought and Language, Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.
Schwab, J. (1960). Enquiry, the science teacher, and the educator. // The Science Teacher, 27, 6–11.
Schwab, J. (1966). The teaching of science. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.
Song,Y., Shwenz, R. (2013). An Inquiry Based Approach to Teaching the Spherical Earth Model to preservice teachers using the global positioning system. // Journal of College Science Teaching. Vol. 42. No 4. P. 50-58.
Suchman, J. (1972). A child and the Inquiry process. // The Psychology of Open Teaching and Learning. Ed. M.L. Silberman, et al. Boston: Little, Brown. P. 147-159.

Watt S. J., Therrien, William J., Kaldenberg E, and Taylor J. (2013).  Promoting Inclusive Practices in Inquiry Based  Science Classrooms. // Teaching Exceptional Children. Vol. 45. No 4. P. 40-48. 

Tatar, N. (2012). Inquiry based science laboratories: an analysis of pre-service teachers’ beliefs about learning science through inquiry and their performances. // Journal of Baltic Science Education. Vol. 11, No 3, P. 248-266. Thelen, H. (1960). Education and the human quest. New York: Harper & Row.
Yasar, S & Nuban, N. (2009). Students’ opinions regarding to the inquiry-based learning approach. // Elementary Education Online. 8(2), P. 457-475.

Webographie

  • Pleins feux sur l'enquête. Guide de mise en oeuvre de l'apprentissage basé sur l'enquête élaboré par Alberta Education, Canada.

Les chapitres de cet ouvrage sous forme de pdf peuvent être consultés à l'adresse suivante : http://education.alberta.ca/search.asp?q=enqu%C3%AAte

Outils personnels
Espaces de noms
Variantes
Actions
Navigation
Outils
Assistance
Imprimer / exporter